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J Orthop Trauma. 2012 Jul;26(7):e83-7. doi: 10.1097/BOT.0b013e318228b7ad.

All-terrain vehicle-related orthopaedic trauma in North Central West Virginia: an 8-year review of a Level I trauma center.

Author information

1
Department of Orthopaedics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-9196, USA. mdietz@hsc.wvu.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

All-terrain vehicle (ATV)-related trauma is increasing nationally. This study highlights the demographics, mechanisms, and associated orthopaedic injuries for ATV-related traumas that presented to our Level I trauma center over an 8-year period and addresses the effects of statewide legislation on injury occurrences.

DESIGN:

Retrospective.

SETTING:

Level I trauma center in West Virginia.

PATIENTS:

Those presenting to a Level I trauma center with ATV-related injuries between January 2000 and June 2007.

MAIN OUTCOMES:

We reviewed data available for demographics, substance abuse, helmet use, length of stay, discharge disposition, injury mechanism and severity, anatomic location of injuries, and orthopaedic injuries.

RESULTS:

In 2000, 72 individuals presented with ATV-related injuries; this number rose significantly each year to 234 individuals in 2006. Of the 1234 patients over 8 years, 79% were male and 95% were white. The average age was 30 years (range, 1-87 years) with 22% of those injured being aged 16 years or younger. Only 27% of the riders were helmeted. There were 647 (52%) patients who sustained orthopaedic injuries (defined as fractures or dislocations). There was no significant decrease in injury occurrence after the implementation of statewide ATV-related legislation in 2004.

CONCLUSIONS:

This trauma center is in a unique position to highlight a national problem. Over half (52%) of the patients had an orthopaedic injury defined as a fracture or dislocation. Before measures can be implemented to effect change, we must first be aware of the exact nature and spectrum of injuries associated with ATV use.

PMID:
22337482
DOI:
10.1097/BOT.0b013e318228b7ad
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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