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Int Psychogeriatr. 2012 Aug;24(8):1265-74. doi: 10.1017/S1041610211002110. Epub 2012 Feb 14.

Frailty, depression, and anxiety in later life.

Author information

1
TRIL Clinic (Technology Research for Independent Living), St James's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. ainemullen@gmail.com

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Anxiety and depression are common in older people but are often missed; to improve detection we must focus on those elderly people at risk. Frailty is a geriatric syndrome inferring increased risk of poor outcomes. Our objective was to explore the relationship between frailty and clinically significant anxiety and depression in later life.

METHODS:

This study had a cross-sectional design and involved the assessment of 567 community-dwelling people aged ≥ 60 years recruited from the Technology Research for Independent Living (TRIL) Clinic, Dublin. Frailty was measured using the Fried biological syndrome model; depressive symptoms were assessed using the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale; and anxiety symptoms measured using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale.

RESULTS:

Higher depression and anxiety scores were identified in both pre-frail and frail groups compared to robust elders (three-way factorial ANOVA, p ≤ 0.0001). In a logistic regression model the odds ratio for frailty showed a significantly higher likelihood of clinically meaningful depressive and anxiety symptoms even controlling for age, gender and a history of depression or anxiety requiring pharmacotherapy (OR = 4.3; 95% CI 1.5, 11.9; p = 0.005; OR = 4.36; 95% CI 1.4, 13.8; p = 0.013 respectively).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings suggest that even at the earliest stage of pre-frailty, there is an association with increased symptoms of emotional distress; once frailty develops there is a higher likelihood of clinically significant depression and anxiety. Frailty may be relevant in identifying older people at risk of deteriorating mental health.

PMID:
22333477
DOI:
10.1017/S1041610211002110
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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