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Gynecol Oncol. 2012 May;125(2):330-5. doi: 10.1016/j.ygyno.2012.01.052. Epub 2012 Feb 10.

Metabolic risk factors and cervical cancer in the metabolic syndrome and cancer project (Me-Can).

Author information

1
Department of Medical Statistics, Informatics and Health Economics, Innsbruck Medical University, Austria.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Little is known about the association between metabolic risk factors and cervical cancer carcinogenesis.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

During mean follow-up of 11 years of the Me-Can cohort (N=288,834) 425 invasive cervical cancer cases were diagnosed. Hazard ratios (HRs) were estimated by the use of Cox proportional hazards regression models for quintiles and standardized z-scores (with a mean of 0 and a SD of 1) of BMI, blood pressure, glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides and MetS score. Risk estimates were corrected for random error in the measurements.

RESULTS:

BMI (per 1SD increment) was associated with 12%, increase of cervical cancer risk, blood pressure with 25% and triglycerides with 39%, respectively. In models including all metabolic factors, the associations for blood pressure and triglycerides persisted. The metabolic syndrome (MetS) score was associated with 26% increased corrected risk of cervical cancer. Triglycerides were stronger associated with squamous cell carcinoma (HR 1.48; 95% CI, 1.20-1.83) than with adenocarcinoma (0.92, 0.54-1.56). Among older women cholesterol (50-70 years 1.34; 1.00-1.81), triglycerides (50-70 years 1.49, 1.03-2.16 and ≥70 years 1.54, 1.09-2.19) and glucose (≥ 70 years 1.87, 1.13-3.11) were associated with increased cervical cancer risk.

CONCLUSION:

The presence of obesity, elevated blood pressure and triglycerides were associated with increased risk of cervical cancer.

PMID:
22330614
DOI:
10.1016/j.ygyno.2012.01.052
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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