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Cancer Discov. 2011 Jun;1(1):78-89. doi: 10.1158/2159-8274.CD-11-0005.

Mutations in the DDR2 kinase gene identify a novel therapeutic target in squamous cell lung cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Medical Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract

While genomically targeted therapies have improved outcomes for patients with lung adenocarcinoma, little is known about the genomic alterations which drive squamous cell lung cancer. Sanger sequencing of the tyrosine kinome identified mutations in the DDR2 kinase gene in 3.8% of squamous cell lung cancers and cell lines. Squamous lung cancer cell lines harboring DDR2 mutations were selectively killed by knock-down of DDR2 by RNAi or by treatment with the multi-targeted kinase inhibitor dasatinib. Tumors established from a DDR2 mutant cell line were sensitive to dasatinib in xenograft models. Expression of mutated DDR2 led to cellular transformation which was blocked by dasatinib. A squamous cell lung cancer patient with a response to dasatinib and erlotinib treatment harbored a DDR2 kinase domain mutation. These data suggest that gain-of-function mutations in DDR2 are important oncogenic events and are amenable to therapy with dasatinib. As dasatinib is already approved for use, these findings could be rapidly translated into clinical trials.

SIGNIFICANCE:

DDR2 mutations are present in 4% of lung SCCs, and DDR2 mutations are associated with sensitivity to dasatinib. These findings provide a rationale for designing clinical trials with the FDA-approved drug dasatinib in patients with lung SCCs.

KEYWORDS:

DDR2; Squamous cell lung cancer; dasatinib; lung cancer genomics; tyrosine kinase inhibitors

PMID:
22328973
PMCID:
PMC3274752
DOI:
10.1158/2159-8274.CD-11-0005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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