Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Infect Control. 2012 Nov;40(9):849-53. doi: 10.1016/j.ajic.2011.10.019. Epub 2012 Feb 9.

Risk factors for community- and health facility-acquired extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing bacterial infections in patients at the University of Minnesota Medical Center, Fairview.

Author information

1
School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55414, USA. sied0020@umn.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

This study examined risk factors for extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) infection in patients at the University of Minnesota Medical Center, Fairview.

METHODS:

Laboratory-confirmed cases of ESBL infection between January 2005 and June 2008 were evaluated in a case-control study. Risk factors were assessed based on source of infection, either health facility-acquired (HFA) or community-acquired (CA). Cases were identified through hospital infection control department ESBL surveillance records. Controls were selected from the patient population present within the same facility as the cases.

RESULTS:

Our evaluation revealed that 60.6% of the health facility-acquired ESBL infections were due to Escherichia coli. Risk factors included previous antibiotic use (odds ratio [OR], 23.7; P < .0001), recurrent urinary tract infection (OR, 7.0; P < .022), venous or arterial catheter use (OR, 12.5; P < .0001), and long-term care facility residence (OR, 7.7; P = .043). For each day of antibiotic use, the risk of infection increased by 2%. Similarly, 76.5% of the community-acquired ESBL infections were due to E coli. Risk factors included previous antibiotic use (OR, 5.1; P = .0005) and recurrent urinary tract infection (OR, 9.1; P = .0098). For each day of antibiotic use, the risk of infection increased by 1%.

CONCLUSIONS:

Developing policies and methods to promote good antibiotic stewardship and reduce the incidence of urinary tract infections will decrease the risk of ESBL infection.

PMID:
22325481
DOI:
10.1016/j.ajic.2011.10.019
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center