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Nutrition. 2012 Jul;28(7-8):762-6. doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2011.11.005. Epub 2012 Feb 9.

Circulating selenium and carboxymethyl-lysine, an advanced glycation endproduct, are independent predictors of anemia in older community-dwelling adults.

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1
Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To assess whether selenium and carboxymethyl-lysine (CML), two biomarkers of oxidative stress, are independent predictors of anemia in older community-dwelling adults.

METHODS:

Plasma levels of selenium, CML, folate, vitamin B12, and testosterone and markers of iron status and inflammation were measured at baseline in 1036 adults at least 65 y old in the Invecchiare in Chianti Study, a population-based cohort study of aging in Tuscany, Italy, and examined in relation to prevalent anemia and incident anemia over 6 y of follow-up.

RESULTS:

At enrollment, 11.6% of participants were anemic. Of 472 participants who were non-anemic at enrollment, 72 (15.3%) developed anemia within 6 y of follow-up. At enrollment, plasma CML in the highest quartile (>425 ng/mL) and plasma selenium in the lowest quartile (<66.6 μg/L) predicted incident anemia (hazard ratio 1.67, 95% confidence interval 1.07-2.59, P = 0.02; hazard ratio 1.55, 95% confidence interval 1.01-2.38, P = 0.05, respectively) in a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model that adjusted for age, education, body mass index, cognition, inflammation, red blood cell distribution width, ferritin, vitamin B12, testosterone, and chronic diseases.

CONCLUSION:

Elevated plasma CML and low plasma selenium are long-term independent predictors of anemia in older community-dwelling adults. These findings support the idea that oxidative stress contributes to the development of anemia.

PMID:
22325035
PMCID:
PMC3377823
DOI:
10.1016/j.nut.2011.11.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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