Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eur Respir J. 2012 Sep;40(3):548-54. doi: 10.1183/09031936.00155811. Epub 2012 Feb 9.

Efficacy of a nicotine mouth spray in smoking cessation: a randomised, double-blind trial.

Author information

1
Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Gentofte University Hospital, DK-2900 Hellerup, Denmark. philipt@dadlnet.dk

Abstract

A nicotine mouth spray has advantages over other acute forms of nicotine replacement therapy, such as a faster uptake of nicotine and faster relief of craving. This multicentre, randomised (2:1), double-blind, placebo-controlled efficacy and safety study evaluated self-reported, carbon monoxide-verified continuous abstinence from smoking from week 2 until weeks 6, 24, and 52 in 479 smokers (≥ 1 cigarette per day) who were treated with either active (n=318) or placebo (n=161) spray for 12 weeks and low-intensity counselling at three smoking cessation clinics in Denmark and Germany. Active treatment yielded significantly higher continuous abstinence rates than placebo from week 2 until week 6 (26.1% versus 16.1%; relative success rate (RR) 1.62, 95% CI 1.09-2.41), week 24 (15.7% versus 6.8%; RR 2.30, 95% CI 1.23-4.30), and week 52 (13.8% versus 5.6%; RR 2.48, 95% CI 1.24-4.94). Most adverse events were mild to moderate, and 9.1% of subjects on active spray withdrew due to adverse events, compared to 7.5% on placebo. The overall rate of treatment-related adverse events was 87.4% with active spray versus 71.4% with placebo spray. Nicotine mouth spray delivered significantly higher 6-, 24- and 52-week continuous abstinence rates than placebo.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00759304 NCT00766584.

PMID:
22323576
PMCID:
PMC3432241
DOI:
10.1183/09031936.00155811
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center