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Otol Neurotol. 2012 Apr;33(3):291-6. doi: 10.1097/MAO.0b013e3182429512.

Postoperative validation of bone-anchored implants in the single-sided deafness population.

Author information

1
Department of Otolaryngology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, USA. hsnapp@med.miami.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to present objective and subjective outcomes on speech-in-noise testing as a predictor of patient performance after bone-anchored implant surgery in patients with single-sided deafness (SSD).

DESIGN:

Retrospective review of adult subjects who received bone-anchored implants for the indication of SSD comparing results on speech-in-noise measures in the unaided condition to postoperative aided condition using the patient's external bone-anchored implant processor as a validation of device performance.

SETTING:

Tertiary referral center providing outpatient surgical and audiologic care.

PATIENTS:

Adult English speaking subjects with SSD who underwent bone-anchored implantation between 2005 and 2010.

INTERVENTION:

Subjects were evaluated with speech-in-noise measures in the sound field using a 90/270 speaker configuration in both the unaided and aided implant condition for validation of implant performance. Subjective benefit was evaluated using the Glasgow Hearing Aid Benefit Profile.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Outcome measures included signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss and word recognition ability in noise as measured using the QuickSIN and the Glasgow Hearing Aid Benefit Profile.

RESULTS:

A significant improvement in speech-in-noise measures was noted in the postoperative aided condition when compared with the unaided condition (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p < 0.0001). Significant decrease in disability postoperatively also was observed (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, p < 0.001). Positive associations were observed for postoperative aided SNR loss and benefit, satisfaction, and use. Passing-Bablok regression analysis showed the preoperative and postoperative results to be statistically equivalent.

CONCLUSION:

The results support the use of speech-in-noise measures as an accurate postimplantation assessment of overall benefit in patients with SSD. SNR loss is a good predictor of postoperative subjective benefit and satisfaction.

PMID:
22314919
DOI:
10.1097/MAO.0b013e3182429512
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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