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Sleep Breath. 2013 Mar;17(1):99-104. doi: 10.1007/s11325-012-0655-9. Epub 2012 Feb 4.

Insomnia symptoms influence CPAP compliance.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, Sleep Disorder Center, University Medical Center Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany. christoph.pieh@medbo.de

Abstract

PURPOSE:

The aim of this study is to determine parameters which influence 6-month compliance of continuous positive airway pressure therapy (CPAP) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS).

METHODS:

This prospective study investigated 73 patients (24 females) with OSAS and medical indication for CPAP therapy: age 55.1 ± 11.5 years, body mass index (BMI) 30.8 ± 5.0 kg/m2, Apnea-Hypopnea Index (AHI) 39.2 ± 26.7/h, Oxygen Desaturation Index (ODI) 33.2 ± 25.4/h, minimum O(2) saturation 78.9 ± 7.6%. The influence of baseline parameters (demographic and polysomnographic data, sleeping medication intakes, BMI, psychometrics [Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Regensburg Insomnia Scale, Vigilance test and Beck Depression Inventory]) on 6-month compliance was evaluated with a correlation and a linear regression analysis.

RESULTS:

The baseline value of the Regensburg Insomnia Scale (RIS) predicts 6-month CPAP compliance (r = -0.376, R (2) = 0.14, p < 0.001), although no other baseline parameter correlates. Patients with a compliance of <4 h/night show higher RIS scores, i.e., more insomnia symptoms (17.6 ± 8.8) compared to those with ≥4 h/night (12.6 ± 6.9; p < 0.05).

CONCLUSIONS:

Insomnia symptoms prior to the beginning of CPAP treatment show a negative influence on CPAP compliance. Further studies should clarify, if a treatment of insomnia symptoms leads to a benefit in compliance.

PMID:
22311553
DOI:
10.1007/s11325-012-0655-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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