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Am J Phys Med Rehabil. 2012 Apr;91(4):327-31; quiz 332-6. doi: 10.1097/PHM.0b013e318246607b.

Cognitive impairments and depressive symptoms did not impede upper limb recovery in a clinical repetitive task practice program after stroke: a pilot study.

Author information

1
Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Pittsburgh School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Pennsylvania, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We examined whether cognitive impairments or depressive symptoms impeded improvement in upper limb function in a clinical repetitive task practice program.

DESIGN:

Participants had mild to moderate upper limb impairment after stroke (n = 20). We characterized baseline cognitive function and depressive symptoms using the Repeatable Battery of Neuropsychological Status and the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression. We measured upper limb function at baseline, week 4, and week 24 using the Action Research Arm Test.

RESULTS:

Participants with and without cognitive impairments improved significantly over time (F(1,17) = 84.48, P < 0.001) regardless of cognitive status (t(31) = 1.42, P = 0.16) or time since stroke (t(17) = 0.07, P = 0.95). Participants with and without depressive symptoms improved significantly over time (F(1,18) = 86.29, P < 0.001), but participants with depressive symptoms demonstrated greater improvement than did participants with no depressive symptoms (t(31) = 3.19, P = 0.003), regardless of time since stroke (t(17) = 0.06, P = 0.95).

CONCLUSIONS:

Preliminary findings suggest that cognitive impairments and depressive symptoms may not impede benefit from repetitive task practice after stroke.

PMID:
22311057
PMCID:
PMC3299885
DOI:
10.1097/PHM.0b013e318246607b
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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