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Spinal Cord. 2012 Jul;50(7):548-52. doi: 10.1038/sc.2012.1. Epub 2012 Feb 7.

A comparison of patients' and physiotherapists' expectations about walking post spinal cord injury: a longitudinal cohort study.

Author information

1
Rehabilitation Studies Unit, Northern Clinical School, Sydney School of Medicine, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. lisa.harvey@sydney.edu.au

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN:

A longitudinal cohort study.

OBJECTIVE:

The primary objective of this study was to compare the expectations that patients with recent spinal cord injury (SCI) had about walking 1 year from injury with the expectations of their physiotherapists.

SETTING:

Two Sydney SCI units.

METHODS:

A consecutive series of 47 patients admitted to the metropolitan SCI units was recruited. Using the mobility scale, expectations of the patients and their physiotherapists about walking at 1 year from SCI were recorded at the time of admission to rehabilitation. Ability to walk was then assessed at 1 year from the SCI.

RESULTS:

On admission to rehabilitation, 31 patients expected to walk about their homes at 1 year post SCI, but only 18 (58%) of these patients did so. In contrast, physiotherapists expected 21 patients to be able to walk about their homes at 1 year post SCI, with 17 (81%) of these patients doing so. Similarly, whereas 21 patients expected to walk about the community at 1 year post SCI, only 11 (52%) of these patients did so. Physiotherapists expected 8 patients to walk about the community at 1 year post SCI and 7 (88%) of these patients did so. The differences between patients' and physiotherapists' expectations about walking were statistically significant (P<0.001).

CONCLUSION:

There is a high degree of disagreement between patients' and physiotherapists' expectations about walking at 1 year post SCI. Differences between patients' and physiotherapists' expectations about walking are potentially problematic and requires research to identify appropriate management strategies.

PMID:
22310321
DOI:
10.1038/sc.2012.1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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