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Neurotoxicology. 2012 Mar;33(2):178-88. doi: 10.1016/j.neuro.2012.01.010. Epub 2012 Jan 30.

Industrial toxicants and Parkinson's disease.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental Health, Rollins School of Public Health, Center for Neurodegenerative Disease, Emory University, Atlanta, GA 30322, United States. William.m.caudle@emory.edu

Abstract

The exposure of the human population to environmental contaminants is recognized as a significant contributing factor for the development of Parkinson's disease (PD) and other forms of parkinsonism. While pesticides have repeatedly been identified as risk factors for PD, these compounds represent only a subset of environmental toxicants that we are exposed to on a regular basis. Thus, non-pesticide contaminants, such as metals, solvents, and other organohalogen compounds have also been implicated in the clinical and pathological manifestations of these movement disorders and it is these non-pesticide compounds that are the subject of this review. As toxic exposures to these classes of compounds can result in a spectrum of PD or PD-related disorders, it is imperative to appreciate shared clinico-pathological characteristics or mechanisms of action of these compounds in order to further delineate the resultant disorders as well as identify improved preventive strategies or therapeutic interventions.

PMID:
22309908
PMCID:
PMC3299826
DOI:
10.1016/j.neuro.2012.01.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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