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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 Feb 7;109(6):1878-82. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1120972109. Epub 2012 Jan 23.

Negative and competitive social interactions are related to heightened proinflammatory cytokine activity.

Author information

1
Department of Psychology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.

Abstract

Research has consistently documented that social relationships influence physical health, a link that may implicate systemic inflammation. We examined whether daily social interactions predict levels of proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and the soluble receptor for tumor necrosis factor-α (sTNFαRII) and their reactivity to a social stressor. One-hundred twenty-two healthy young adults completed daily diaries for 8 d that assessed positive, negative, and competitive social interactions. Participants then engaged in laboratory stress challenges, and IL-6 and sTNFαRII were collected at baseline and at 25- and 80-min poststressor, from oral mucosal transudate. Negative social interactions predicted elevated sTNFαRII at baseline, and IL-6 and sTNFαRII 25-min poststressor, as well as total output of sTNFαRII. Competitive social interactions predicted elevated baseline levels of IL-6 and sTNFαRII and total output of both cytokines. These findings suggest that daily social interactions that are negative and competitive are associated prospectively with heightened proinflammatory cytokine activity.

PMID:
22308464
PMCID:
PMC3277534
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1120972109
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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