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Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2012 Feb 21;109(8):2854-9. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1118003109. Epub 2012 Jan 30.

Maternal support in early childhood predicts larger hippocampal volumes at school age.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO 63110, USA. lubyj@psychiatry.wustl.edu

Abstract

Early maternal support has been shown to promote specific gene expression, neurogenesis, adaptive stress responses, and larger hippocampal volumes in developing animals. In humans, a relationship between psychosocial factors in early childhood and later amygdala volumes based on prospective data has been demonstrated, providing a key link between early experience and brain development. Although much retrospective data suggests a link between early psychosocial factors and hippocampal volumes in humans, to date there has been no prospective data to inform this potentially important public health issue. In a longitudinal study of depressed and healthy preschool children who underwent neuroimaging at school age, we investigated whether early maternal support predicted later hippocampal volumes. Maternal support observed in early childhood was strongly predictive of hippocampal volume measured at school age. The positive effect of maternal support on hippocampal volumes was greater in nondepressed children. These findings provide prospective evidence in humans of the positive effect of early supportive parenting on healthy hippocampal development, a brain region key to memory and stress modulation.

PMID:
22308421
PMCID:
PMC3286943
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1118003109
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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