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HIV Clin Trials. 2012 Jan-Feb;13(1):23-32. doi: 10.1310/hct1301-023.

High-level immunogenicity is achieved vaccine with adjuvanted pandemic H1N1(2009) and improved with booster dosing in a randomized trial of HIV-infected adults.

Author information

1
The Ottawa Hospital Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada. ccooper@ottawahospital.on.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

More severe influenza disease and poor vaccine immunogenicity in HIV-infected patients necessitate improved immunization strategies to maximize vaccine efficacy.

METHODS:

A phase III, randomized trial was conducted at 4 Canadian sites. Two dosing strategies (standard dose vs standard dose plus booster on day 21) were assessed in HIV patients aged 20 to 59 years during the H1N1(2009) pandemic. A single antigen, inactivated split adjuvanted (AS03(A)) influenza vaccine (Arepanrix) was utilized. Serum hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) titres were assessed at days 21 and 42 and at month 6.

RESULTS:

150 participants received at least one injection. Baseline parameters were similar between groups: 83% male, 85% on HAART, median CD4 = 519 cells/mm(3), 84% with HIV RNA < 50 copies/mL. At day 21, seroprotection (HAI ≥1:40) was achieved in 80% (95% CI, 70-89) of participants. Seroconversion occurred in 74% (63-85). Seroprotection and seroconversion were further improved in those randomized to booster dosing: day 42, 94% (85-98) versus 73% (60-83) (P < .01) and 86% (75-93) versus 66% (5-77) (P = .01). Seroprotec-tion was retained in 40% (28-54) of recipients at month 6 with trends toward greater retention of immunity in booster recipients.

CONCLUSION:

High-level immunogenicity was achieved with a single dose of this adjuvanted vaccine. Immunogenicity was further improved with booster dosing. Use of this adjuvanted vaccine and booster represent an important approach to increasing immunogenicity in this vaccine hypo-responsive population.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01002040.

PMID:
22306585
DOI:
10.1310/hct1301-23
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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