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Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2012 Jul;19(6):1994-2006. doi: 10.1007/s11356-012-0764-9.

Abiotic degradation of chlorinated ethanes and ethenes in water.

Author information

1
Department of Analytical Chemistry, Chemical Faculty, Gdańsk University of Technology (GUT), ul. G. Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdańsk, Poland. marektobiszewski@wp.pl

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Chlorinated ethanes and ethenes are among the most frequently detected organic pollutants of water. Their physicochemical properties are such that they can contaminate aquifers for decades. In favourable conditions, they can undergo degradation. In anaerobic conditions, chlorinated solvents can undergo reductive dechlorination.

DEGRADATION PATHWAYS:

Abiotic dechlorination is usually slower than microbial but abiotic dechlorination is usually complete. In favourable conditions, abiotic reactions bring significant contribution to natural attenuation processes. Abiotic agents that may enhance the reductive dechlorination of chlorinated ethanes and ethenes are zero-valent metals, sulphide minerals or green rusts.

OXIDATION:

At some sites, permanganate and Fenton's reagent can be used as remediation tool for oxidation of chlorinated ethanes and ethenes.

SUMMARY:

Nanoscale iron or bimetallic particles, due to high efficiency in degradation of chlorinated ethanes and ethenes, have gained much interest. They allow for rapid degradation of chlorinated ethanes and ethenes in water phase, but they also give benefit of treating dense non-aqueous phase liquid.

PMID:
22293908
PMCID:
PMC3390699
DOI:
10.1007/s11356-012-0764-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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