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Stroke. 2012 Apr;43(4):1126-8. doi: 10.1161/STROKEAHA.111.644716. Epub 2012 Jan 26.

Intracerebral hemorrhage in the very old: future demographic trends of an aging population.

Author information

1
Department of Neurosurgery, University Clinics of Giessen and Marburg GmbH, Campus Giessen, Klinikstrasse 33, 35392 Giessen, Germany. Dr.stein@email.de

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

In most European societies and in the United States, the percentage of patients ≥80 years has been rising over the past century. The present study was conducted to observe this demographic change and its impact on patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH).

METHODS:

We reviewed patients' data with the diagnosis of ICH from January 2007 to December 2009. All data were collected out of a prospective stroke registry covering the entire state of Hesse, Germany. Incidence rates and absolute numbers of patients with ICH for 2009 to 2050 were calculated.

RESULTS:

Of 3448 patients, 34% had an age ≥80 years. Hospital mortality was 35.9% for patients ≥80 years and 20.0% for patients <80 years. Unfavorable outcome (modified Rankin Scale score >2) was more often found in patients ≥80 years compared with patients <80 years (84.9% versus 74.8%). By the year 2050, the proportion of all patients with ICH ≥80 years will be 2.5-fold higher than in 2009. The total number of ICH cases will increase approximately 35.2% assuming that ICH probability stays the same. The number of patients who die in the hospital will increase approximately 60.2%. The total number of patients with severe disability due to ICH will increase approximately 36.8%.

CONCLUSIONS:

If current treatment strategies according to age remain unchanged, an increase of in-hospital mortality and a higher proportion of patients who need lifelong care after ICH can be expected in the coming decades.

PMID:
22282880
DOI:
10.1161/STROKEAHA.111.644716
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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