Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Am J Audiol. 2012 Jun;21(1):33-40. doi: 10.1044/1059-0889(2011/11-0024). Epub 2012 Jan 23.

Association between cardiorespiratory fitness and hearing sensitivity.

Author information

1
Bellarmine University, Louisville, KY, USA. ploprinzi@bellarmine.edu.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

As a follow-up to previous smaller scale studies, the purpose of the present study was to examine the link between cardiorespiratory fitness and hearing sensitivity using a nationally representative U.S. sample of adults.

METHOD:

Data from the 1999-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES; U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2011) were used in the analyses. After exclusions, the final sample included 1,082 NHANES participants ages 20-49 years. Maximum oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) was obtained from an established nonexercise prediction equation and through heart-rate extrapolation during a treadmill-based submaximal test. Audiometry data were objectively measured to obtain estimates of low (LPTA) and high (HPTA) pure-tone frequency average.

RESULTS:

VO(2max) was not associated with hearing sensitivity when using the heart-rate extrapolation method but was significantly associated with hearing sensitivity (for women) when applying the nonexercise prediction equation for both LPTA and HPTA (p < .01). Women with higher predicted cardiorespiratory fitness were 6% more likely than women with lower predicted cardio-respiratory fitness to have good hearing compared to worse hearing.

CONCLUSION:

Cardiorespiratory fitness was associated with hearing sensitivity when using the nonexercise prediction equation to measure VO(2max). Further studies are needed to confirm these findings. Findings suggest a potentially auditory-protective effect of cardiorespiratory fitness.

PMID:
22271908
DOI:
10.1044/1059-0889(2011/11-0024)
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Atypon
Loading ...
Support Center