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Ann Behav Med. 2012 Jun;43(3):372-82. doi: 10.1007/s12160-011-9342-5.

The effect of patient-provider communication on medication adherence in hypertensive black patients: does race concordance matter?

Author information

1
Center for Healthful Behavior Change, Department of Medicine, New York University School of Medicine, NY 10016, USA. antoinette.schoenthaler@nyumc.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Despite evidence of a positive effect of collaborative patient-provider communication on patient outcomes, our understanding of this relationship is unclear.

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this paper is to determine whether racial composition of the relationship modified the association between ratings of provider communication and medication adherence.

METHODS:

Effect modification of the communication-adherence association, by racial composition of the relationship, was evaluated using general linear mixed models while adjusting for selected covariates.

RESULTS:

Three hundred ninety patients were in race-concordant (black patient, black provider) relationships, while 207 were in race-discordant (black patient, white provider) relationships. The communication-adherence association was significantly modified in race-discordant relationships (p = 0.04). Communication rated as more collaborative in race-discordant relationships was associated with better adherence, while communication rated as less collaborative was associated with poor adherence. There was no significant association between adherence and communication in race-concordant relationships (p = 0.24).

CONCLUSIONS:

Collaborative patient-provider communication may play an influential role in black patients' adherence behaviors when receiving care from white providers.

PMID:
22270266
PMCID:
PMC3665951
DOI:
10.1007/s12160-011-9342-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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