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Dev Med Child Neurol. 2012 Mar;54(3):224-30. doi: 10.1111/j.1469-8749.2011.04201.x. Epub 2012 Jan 23.

Heavy maternal alcohol consumption and cerebral palsy in the offspring.

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1
National Drug Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia. colleen.oleary@curtin.edu.au

Abstract

AIM:

The aim of this study was to investigate the association between heavy maternal alcohol consumption and pre- peri- and postneonatally acquired cerebral palsy (CP).

METHOD:

The records of all mothers with an International Classification of Diseases, revision 9 or 10 (ICD-9/-10) alcohol-related diagnostic code, indicating heavy alcohol consumption, recorded on population-based health, mental health, and drug and alcohol data sets from 1983 to 2007, and their children were identified through the Western Australian Data-linkage System. This 'exposed' cohort was frequency matched with mothers without an alcohol-related diagnosis and their offspring (comparison group). Cases of CP were identified through linkage with the Western Australia CP Register. Analyses were undertaken using multivariate logistic regression.

RESULTS:

There were 23 573 live births in the exposed group (58.6% non-Aboriginal; 41.4% Aboriginal) and 292 cases of CP. The odds of pre/perinatally acquired CP were elevated for children of non-Aboriginal mothers with an alcohol-related diagnosis recorded during pregnancy (adjusted odds ratio 3.32; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.30-8.48) and for Aboriginal children when an alcohol-related diagnosis was recorded up to 12 months before the mother's pregnancy (adjusted odds ratio 2.49; 95% CI 0.99-6.25). Increased odds of postneonatally acquired CP following any alcohol-related diagnosis were found for non-Aboriginal children (adjusted odds ratio 7.92; 95% CI 2.23-28.14).

INTERPRETATION:

These results suggest that heavy maternal alcohol consumption is a direct cause of pre/perinatally acquired CP, and an indirect cause of postneonatally acquired CP, in non-Aboriginal children. The lack of an association for Aboriginal children requires further investigation but may be due to under ascertainment of alcohol use disorders during pregnancy and other aetiological pathways.

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