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AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2012 Feb;198(2):448-52. doi: 10.2214/AJR.11.7346.

Pediatric sedation in a community hospital-based outpatient MRI center.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology, Children's Hospital Boston, Harvard Medical School, 300 Longwood Ave, Boston, MA 02115, USA. keira.mason@childrens.harvard.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Although the demand for pediatric MRI is increasing, it is uncommon to find sedation being offered at community hospital-based outpatient centers. We present our safety, efficacy, and outcome data at a community hospital-based outpatient imaging center.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

I.v. dexmedetomidine sedation was administered as a bolus of 3 μg/kg and maintained with a continuous infusion of 1 μg/kg/hr until imaging was complete. The dexmedetomidine bolus could be repeated up to two times, if needed. Quality assurance data were reviewed.

RESULTS:

From April 2009 to July 2010, 279 children (mean age, 4.2 years; age range, 0.2-17.2 years) were sedated. All received a first bolus, 46 required a second dose, and two received a third. The average time to achieve sedation was 7.8 minutes (SD, ± 3.8 minutes). Total duration of imaging (82% brain MRI) averaged 38.1 minutes (range, 8.0-126.0 minutes). On average, discharge criteria were met within 21.3 minutes of arrival in recovery room (± 17.8 minutes). The heart rate and blood pressure deviated from baseline by more than 20% in 5% and 33% of the patients, respectively. No pharmacologic therapy was administered to treat the hemodynamic variability. There were no adverse respiratory events. All imaging studies were successfully completed.

CONCLUSION:

Dexmedetomidine offers an option for pediatric sedation for MRI at community hospital-based outpatient settings. It preserves respiration but elicits deviations in blood pressure and heart rate that have not required pharmacologic intervention. Dexmedetomidine offers a safe, effective, and efficient agent for sedation for children undergoing MRI in an outpatient setting.

PMID:
22268192
DOI:
10.2214/AJR.11.7346
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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