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Neurosciences (Riyadh). 2006 Jan;11(1):11-4.

Gluten sensitivity in autistic children in Central Saudi Arabia.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, King Saud University, PO Box 2925, Riyadh 11461, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Tel. +966 504295974. Fax. +966 (1) 4786798/4671046. E-mail: ayadh2@hotmail.com.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine gluten sensitivity through the measurement of anti-gliadin antibody (IgA and IgG), anti-endomysial antibody (endo-IgA), anti-reticulin antibody (IgG) and anti-transglutamase antibody (IgG) levels in blood samples of autistic in the Riyadh area.

METHODS:

The study took place in the Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh between September 2003 and April 2004. Thirty-three autistic children, from the Riyadh area participated in the study, all with confirmed diagnosis according to E-2 diagnostic criteria for autistic spectrum disorders. Anti-gliadin antibody (IgA and IgG), anti-endomysial antibody (endo-IgA), anti-reticulin antibody (IgG) and anti-transglutamase antibody (IgG), were measured by the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay method.

RESULTS:

Thirty-three autistic children with confirmed diagnosis (30 males and 3 females) participated in the study. A significant percentage of autistic children complained of constipation as compared to control. None of the autistic examined were positive for any of the antibodies tested, including anti-gliadin antibody (IgA and IgG), anti-endomysial antibody (endo-IgA), anti-reticulin antibody (IgG) and anti-transglutamase antibody (IgG). The same results were reached with the control group.

CONCLUSION:

The present study demonstrated that gluten sensitivity is not a major cause in those autistic children examined.

PMID:
22266496

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