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J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2012 Mar;18(2):260-8. doi: 10.1017/S1355617711001664. Epub 2012 Jan 23.

Level of recall, retrieval speed, and variability on the Cued-Recall Retrieval Speed Task (CRRST) in individuals with amnestic mild cognitive impairment.

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1
Department of Neurology and the Einstein Aging Study, Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, Bronx, NY 10461, USA. wendy.ramratan@einstein.yu.edu

Abstract

Individuals with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) show deficits on traditional episodic memory tasks and reductions in speed of performance on reaction time tasks. We present results on a novel task, the Cued-Recall Retrieval Speed Task (CRRST), designed to simultaneously measure level and speed of retrieval. A total of 390 older adults (mean age, 80.2 years), learned 16 words based on corresponding categorical cues. In the retrieval phase, we measured accuracy (% correct) and retrieval speed/reaction time (RT; time from cue presentation to voice onset of a correct response) across 6 trials. Compared to healthy elderly adults (HEA, n = 303), those with aMCI (n = 87) exhibited poorer performance in retrieval speed (difference = -0.13; p < .0001) and accuracy on the first trial (difference = -0.19; p < .0001), and their rate of improvement in retrieval speed was slower over subsequent trials. Those with aMCI also had greater within-person variability in processing speed (variance ratio = 1.22; p = .0098) and greater between-person variability in accuracy (variance ratio = 2.08; p = .0001) relative to HEA. Results are discussed in relation to the possibility that computer-based measures of cued-learning and processing speed variability may facilitate early detection of dementia in at-risk older adults.

PMID:
22265423
PMCID:
PMC3678534
DOI:
10.1017/S1355617711001664
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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