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J Cardiothorac Vasc Anesth. 2012 Jun;26(3):433-8. doi: 10.1053/j.jvca.2011.11.011. Epub 2012 Jan 20.

Anesthetic management of patients undergoing pulmonary vein isolation for treatment of atrial fibrillation using high-frequency jet ventilation.

Author information

1
Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA. nabil.elkassabany@uphs.upenn.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of this study was to describe anesthetic management and perioperative complications in patients undergoing pulmonary vein isolation for the treatment of atrial fibrillation under general anesthesia using high-frequency jet ventilation. The authors also identified variables associated with longer ablation times in this patient cohort.

DESIGN:

A retrospective observational study.

SETTING:

The electrophysiology laboratory in a major university hospital.

PARTICIPANTS:

One hundred eighty-eight consecutive patients undergoing pulmonary vein isolation under general anesthesia with high-frequency jet ventilation.

INTERVENTIONS:

High-frequency jet ventilation was used as the primary mode of ventilation under general anesthesia.

MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS:

High-frequency jet ventilation was performed successfully throughout the ablation procedure in 175 cases of the study cohort. The remaining 13 patients had to be converted to conventional positive-pressure ventilation because of high PaCO(2) or low PaO(2) on arterial blood gas measurements. Variables associated with a shorter ablation time included a higher ejection fraction (p = 0.04) and case volume performed by each electrophysiologist in the study group (p = 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS:

High-frequency jet ventilation is generally a safe technique that can be used in catheter ablation treatment under general anesthesia.

PMID:
22265337
DOI:
10.1053/j.jvca.2011.11.011
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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