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Connect Tissue Res. 2012;53(5):349-54. doi: 10.3109/03008207.2012.657309. Epub 2012 Jul 24.

Differential expression of wound fibrotic factors between facial and trunk dermal fibroblasts.

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1
Department of Plastic Surgery, Kyorin University School of Medicine, Mitaka-shi, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

Clinically, wounds on the face tend to heal with less scarring than those on the trunk, but the causes of this difference have not been clarified. Fibroblasts obtained from different parts of the body are known to show different properties. To investigate whether the characteristic properties of facial and trunk wound healing are caused by differences in local fibroblasts, we comparatively analyzed the functional properties of superficial and deep dermal fibroblasts obtained from the facial and trunk skin of seven individuals, with an emphasis on tendency for fibrosis. Proliferation kinetics and mRNA and protein expression of 11 fibrosis-associated factors were investigated. The proliferation kinetics of facial and trunk fibroblasts were identical, but the expression and production levels of profibrotic factors, such as extracellular matrix, transforming growth factor-β1, and connective tissue growth factor mRNA, were lower in facial fibroblasts when compared with trunk fibroblasts, while the expression of antifibrotic factors, such as collagenase, basic fibroblast growth factor, and hepatocyte growth factor, showed no clear trends. The differences in functional properties of facial and trunk dermal fibroblasts were consistent with the clinical tendencies of healing of facial and trunk wounds. Thus, the differences between facial and trunk scarring are at least partly related to the intrinsic nature of the local dermal fibroblasts.

PMID:
22260504
PMCID:
PMC3483065
DOI:
10.3109/03008207.2012.657309
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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