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Osteoporos Int. 2012 Dec;23(12):2775-83. doi: 10.1007/s00198-012-1893-1. Epub 2012 Jan 19.

Age-related changes in proximal humerus bone health in healthy, white males.

Author information

1
Center for Translational Musculoskeletal Research, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN, USA.

Abstract

The proximal humerus is a common site for osteoporotic fracture. The current study demonstrates the rate of age-related decline in proximal humerus bone health. The data suggest aging is associated with considerable loss of bone mass, structural deterioration and reduced bone strength at the proximal humerus.

INTRODUCTION:

The proximal humerus is relatively under investigated despite being the fourth most common site for osteoporotic fracture.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional study was performed to assess age-related changes in dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) properties of the proximal humerus in a cohort of 170 healthy, white males.

RESULTS:

Regression models estimated considerable age-related loss of DXA measured bone quantity at the proximal humerus, with areal bone mineral density modeled to decline by 29% (95% confidence interval [CI], 17.5-35.0%) in the 50 years between ages 30 and 80 years (p < 0.001). pQCT measures indicated aging was associated with progressive periosteal and endosteal expansion, with the later occurring more rapidly as indicated by age-related declines in cortical bone mass, area and thickness (all p < 0.01). The net result of the density, mass and structural changes was a 26% (95% CI, 13.5-38.0%) decline in pQCT estimated proximal humerus bone strength in the 50 years between ages 30 and 80 years (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSION:

Aging is associated with considerable declines in proximal humeral bone health which, when coupled with a traumatic event such as a fall, may contribute to osteoporotic fracture at this site.

PMID:
22258805
PMCID:
PMC3624900
DOI:
10.1007/s00198-012-1893-1
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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