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Nature. 2012 Jan 18;481(7381):321-8. doi: 10.1038/nature10717.

The Amazon basin in transition.

Author information

1
The Woods Hole Research Center, 149 Woods Hole Road, Falmouth, Massachusetts 02540-1644, USA. edavidson@whrc.org

Erratum in

  • Nature. 2012 Mar 8;483(7388):232.

Abstract

Agricultural expansion and climate variability have become important agents of disturbance in the Amazon basin. Recent studies have demonstrated considerable resilience of Amazonian forests to moderate annual drought, but they also show that interactions between deforestation, fire and drought potentially lead to losses of carbon storage and changes in regional precipitation patterns and river discharge. Although the basin-wide impacts of land use and drought may not yet surpass the magnitude of natural variability of hydrologic and biogeochemical cycles, there are some signs of a transition to a disturbance-dominated regime. These signs include changing energy and water cycles in the southern and eastern portions of the Amazon basin.

PMID:
22258611
DOI:
10.1038/nature10717
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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