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Nature. 2012 Jan 18;481(7381):314-20. doi: 10.1038/nature10763.

The contribution of bone to whole-organism physiology.

Author information

1
Department of Genetics and Development, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032, USA. gk2172@columbia.edu

Abstract

The mouse genetic revolution has shown repeatedly that most organs have more functions than expected. This has led to the realization that, in addition to a molecular and cellular approach, there is a need for a whole-organism study of physiology. The skeleton is an example of how a whole-organism approach to physiology can broaden the functions of a given organ, reveal connections of this organ with others such as the brain, pancreas and gut, and shed new light on the pathogenesis of degenerative diseases affecting multiple organs.

PMID:
22258610
DOI:
10.1038/nature10763
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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