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Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2012 Jul;19(6):2281-4. doi: 10.1007/s11356-011-0733-8. Epub 2012 Jan 19.

Seed bank persistence of genetically modified canola in California.

Author information

1
University of California Cooperative Extension, P.O. Box 697, Orland, CA 95963, USA. djmunier@ucdavis.edu

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

Canola, which is genetically modified (GM) for tolerance to glyphosate, has the potential to become established as a new glyphosate resistant weed, thus reducing the effectiveness of glyphosate.

METHODS:

Volunteer from dormant canola seeds produced thousands of plants per hectare in the fourth year (2011) following a 2007 crop harvest. This occurred with no additional canola seed production since the 2007 harvest.

RESULTS:

Volunteer plants following harvests of annual crops are typically only a problem for the first year after harvest. In California, glyphosate is the core herbicide on over a million hectares of high value row, tree, and vine crops and new glyphosate resistant weeds reduce the effectiveness of glyphosate.

CONCLUSIONS:

The combination of dormant seed and herbicide resistance makes GM glyphosate-resistant canola a new and difficult California weed which was first observed in the winter of 2009.

PMID:
22258428
DOI:
10.1007/s11356-011-0733-8
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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