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J Proteome Res. 2012 Mar 2;11(3):1821-31. doi: 10.1021/pr2010605. Epub 2012 Feb 9.

Association of medication with the human plasma N-glycome.

Author information

1
NIBRT Dublin-Oxford Glycobiology Laboratory, National Institute for Bioprocessing Research and Training , Fosters Avenue, Mount Merrion, Blackrock, Dublin 4, Ireland.

Abstract

Glycosylation is highly variable depending on many environmental factors. Using our fully quantitative high-throughput normal phase hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography platform we have identified glycosylation changes associated with medication in the plasma N-glycome from three different population cohorts: ORCADES from the Orkney Islands in Scotland and CROATIA-Vis and CROATIA-Korcula from the Croatian islands of Vis and Korcula. Associations between glycosylation and the use of hormones (oral contraceptives, hormone replacement therapy), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (aspirin and other NSAIDs), oral steroids (prednisolone) and steroid inhalers (beclomethasone) were investigated. Significant differences associated with usage of oral contraceptives were found with increased core-fucosylated biantennary glycans. Decreases in core-fucosylated biantennary glycans, core-fucosylated triantennary glycans with outer-arm fucose, and high mannosylated glycans were associated with the use of anti-inflammatory drugs. All of the changes in glycosylation were independent of blood group status. In conclusion, hormones and anti-inflammatory medication were associated with changes in glycosylation, possibly as a result of the modulatory effect of these drugs on the inflammatory response. In general, cancer is associated with inflammation, and many glycoproteins in the plasma are acute phase related to the host response. These preliminary data indicate the importance of correcting the levels of glycans used as biomarkers for the effects of medication.

PMID:
22256781
DOI:
10.1021/pr2010605
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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