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J Environ Public Health. 2012;2012:185731. doi: 10.1155/2012/185731. Epub 2011 Dec 27.

Human excretion of bisphenol A: blood, urine, and sweat (BUS) study.

Author information

1
Faculty of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. sgenuis@ualberta.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Bisphenol A (BPA) is an ubiquitous chemical contaminant that has recently been associated with adverse effects on human health. There is incomplete understanding of BPA toxicokinetics, and there are no established interventions to eliminate this compound from the human body. Using 20 study participants, this study was designed to assess the relative concentration of BPA in three body fluids-blood, urine, and sweat-and to determine whether induced sweating may be a therapeutic intervention with potential to facilitate elimination of this compound.

METHODS:

Blood, urine, and sweat were collected from 20 individuals (10 healthy participants and 10 participants with assorted health problems) and analyzed for various environmental toxicants including BPA.

RESULTS:

BPA was found to differing degrees in each of blood, urine, and sweat. In 16 of 20 participants, BPA was identified in sweat, even in some individuals with no BPA detected in their serum or urine samples.

CONCLUSIONS:

Biomonitoring of BPA through blood and/or urine testing may underestimate the total body burden of this potential toxicant. Sweat analysis should be considered as an additional method for monitoring bioaccumulation of BPA in humans. Induced sweating appears to be a potential method for elimination of BPA.

PMID:
22253637
PMCID:
PMC3255175
DOI:
10.1155/2012/185731
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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