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Int J Dermatol. 2012 Feb;51(2):173-7. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-4632.2011.04948.x.

Skin diseases in Greek and immigrant children in Athens.

Author information

1
Department of Dermatology, University of Athens Medical School, Andreas Sygros Hospital, Athens, Greece. alkats.duoa@yahoo.gr

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

This study aimed to characterize the spectrum of skin diseases affecting children in Greece.

METHODS:

We retrospectively studied data for 4071 children, aged 0-12 years, who were examined and diagnosed with dermatoses at the outpatient clinic of a university dermatological hospital between December 2005 and August 2007. To evaluate changes in disease patterns, these data were compared with data for a cohort of 12,700 children diagnosed with skin diseases at the same clinic two to three decades earlier (in 1977, 1980, and 1983).

RESULTS:

The most frequent disease was dermatitis/eczema (34.7%), with atopic dermatitis found in 20.7% of children, contact dermatitis in 6.9%, pityriasis alba in 2.1%, and seborrheic dermatitis in 1.8%. Infections (19.3%), nevi (5.6%), scabies (4.8%), and insect bites (4.3%) followed. More viral (12%) than bacterial (3.7%) and fungal (3.6%) infections were noted. Warts constituted 53.2% of viral infections. Immigrants had an increased risk for bacterial infections and scabies.

CONCLUSIONS:

Children diagnosed with skin diseases 24-30 years earlier were younger; exhibited lower prevalences of dermatitis/eczema (P = 0.01), viral infections (P < 0.001) and nevi (P < 0.001); higher prevalences of bacterial and fungal infections (P < 0.001) and insect bites (P < 0.01); and similar rates of scabies (P = 0.17). This study documents the high prevalence of atopic dermatitis in the region, the increasing incidence of viral infections and nevi, and the continuing problem of scabies, especially in immigrants.

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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