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FASEB J. 2012 Apr;26(4):1727-35. doi: 10.1096/fj.11-197921. Epub 2012 Jan 12.

Intestinal microbiota determine severity of myocardial infarction in rats.

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1
Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, 8701 Watertown Plank Rd., Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA.

Abstract

Signals from the intestinal microbiota are important for normal host physiology; alteration of the microbiota (dysbiosis) is associated with multiple disease states. We determined the effect of antibiotic-induced intestinal dysbiosis on circulating cytokine levels and severity of ischemia/reperfusion injury in the heart. Treatment of Dahl S rats with a minimally absorbed antibiotic vancomycin, in the drinking water, decreased circulating leptin levels by 38%, resulted in smaller myocardial infarcts (27% reduction), and improved recovery of postischemic mechanical function (35%) as compared with untreated controls. Vancomycin altered the abundance of intestinal bacteria and fungi, measured by 16S and 18S ribosomal DNA quantity. Pretreatment with leptin (0.12 μg/kg i.v.) 24 h before ischemia/reperfusion abolished cardioprotection produced by vancomycin treatment. Dahl S rats fed the commercially available probiotic product Goodbelly, which contains the leptin-suppressing bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum 299v, also resulted in decreased circulating leptin levels by 41%, smaller myocardial infarcts (29% reduction), and greater recovery of postischemic mechanical function (23%). Pretreatment with leptin (0.12 μg/kg i.v.) abolished cardioprotection produced by Goodbelly. This proof-of-concept study is the first to identify a mechanistic link between changes in intestinal microbiota and myocardial infarction and demonstrates that a probiotic supplement can reduce myocardial infarct size.

PMID:
22247331
PMCID:
PMC3316900
DOI:
10.1096/fj.11-197921
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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