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Vaccine. 2012 Mar 2;30(11):1981-5. doi: 10.1016/j.vaccine.2012.01.009. Epub 2012 Jan 14.

The proportion of influenza vaccination in Ontario, Canada in 2007/2008 compared with other provinces.

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1
Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1S 5S8. juliep@cadth.ca

Abstract

In 2000, Ontario, Canada introduced a universal influenza immunization program (UIIP) to provide free vaccines to its residents, whose ages are six months or older. The current study sought to measure the effect of the UIIP on influenza vaccination uptake in Ontario compared with other provinces combined. Data from the 2007/2008 Canadian Community Health Survey (cycle 4.1) were used in the analyses. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to estimate the odds ratios for influenza vaccination 2007/2008 associated with province of residence (Ontario versus other provinces combined) and other factors including chronic disease status, age, gender, household income, smoking status, having a medical doctor, and self-perceived health status. Living in Ontario was positively associated with having an influenza vaccine during the 2007/2008 season [odds ratio (OR) 1.50, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.45-1.55]. Increased age (OR 6.13, 95% CI 5.77-6.51), a positive chronic disease status (OR 1.70, 95% CI 1.63-1.77) and having a regular medical doctor (OR 1.95, 95% CI 1.85-2.07) also demonstrated a positive relationship with influenza vaccination in 2007/2008. A stratified analysis by province of residence suggested that having a chronic disease, old age and high income had less impact on the likelihood of receiving a vaccine in Ontario than other provinces. The results of this study may help to inform the development of strategies to increase vaccination coverage in Canada.

PMID:
22245605
DOI:
10.1016/j.vaccine.2012.01.009
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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