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J Sci Med Sport. 2012 Jul;15(4):298-304. doi: 10.1016/j.jsams.2011.12.005. Epub 2012 Jan 12.

A population-based study of sport and recreation-related head injuries treated in a Canadian health region.

Author information

1
Alberta Centre for Injury Control and Research, Canada; School of Public Health, University of Alberta, Canada. awharris@ualberta.ca

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To report the rates of SR-related HIs presenting to EDs in a Canadian population-based sample.

DESIGN:

Descriptive epidemiology study.

METHODS:

Using administrative data, sport and recreation-related emergency department presentations for persons 0-35 years of age, from April 1997 through March 2008, were obtained from the Edmonton Zone (formerly the Capital Health Region), Alberta Health Services through the Ambulatory Care Classification System.

RESULTS:

Of the 3,230,890 visits to the emergency departments of the five hospitals in Edmonton, 63,219 sport and recreation-related injury records and 4935 sport and recreation-head injury records were identified. Head injuries were most frequently treated for the activities of hockey (20.7%), cycling (12.0%), and skiing/snowboarding/sledding. Males accounted for 71.9% (n=3546) and patients less than 18 years of age sustained 3446 (69.8%) sport and recreation-head injuries.

CONCLUSIONS:

Sport and recreation-related head injuries most frequently treated in emergency departments involve common activities such as hockey, cycling, skiing/snowboarding/sledding, and soccer. Males and those less than 18 years of age sustain the majority of sport and recreation-related head injuries treated in emergency departments. These findings underscore the importance of sport-specific policies and safety promotion for the prevention of head injuries, in sports and recreational activities.

PMID:
22244346
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsams.2011.12.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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