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Arch Phys Med Rehabil. 2012 Mar;93(3):509-11. doi: 10.1016/j.apmr.2011.09.018. Epub 2012 Jan 11.

Effect of fluid collections on long-term outcome after lower limb amputation.

Author information

1
Osborn Neurorehabilitation Unit, Northern General Hospital, Sheffield, United Kingdom. rajiv.singh@sth.nhs.uk

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To ascertain the long-term outcome for individuals found to have fluid collections in residual limbs after amputation.

DESIGN:

Prospective cohort study.

SETTING:

Outpatient follow-up at a prosthetic rehabilitation unit.

PARTICIPANTS:

Successive lower limb amputations (N=105) scanned for fluid collections after operation and followed up after 3 years.

INTERVENTIONS:

Not applicable.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Survival; secondary outcomes of prosthetic limb use, hours of prosthetic limb-wearing, anxiety and depression levels.

RESULTS:

After 3 years, 70 individuals were alive, of whom 21 (30%) had fluid collections originally. There was no significant difference at follow-up between the group that had fluid collections in their residual limbs after surgery and the group that did not in terms of survival (χ(2)(1)=.21, P=.64), numbers wearing prosthetic limb (χ(2)(1)=.102, P=.75), hours of limb wearing (t(37)=.35, P=.72), anxiety (χ(2)(1)=.77, P=.78), and depression (χ(2)(1)=1.98, P=.16). A multivariable logistic regression confirmed that presence of fluid collection was not associated with survival.

CONCLUSIONS:

Fluid collections in residual limbs after amputation are common, but patients can be reassured that their long-term outcomes are not affected.

PMID:
22244246
DOI:
10.1016/j.apmr.2011.09.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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