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Obesity (Silver Spring). 2012 May;20(5):932-8. doi: 10.1038/oby.2011.371. Epub 2012 Jan 12.

The size of large adipose cells is a predictor of insulin resistance in first-degree relatives of type 2 diabetic patients.

Author information

1
NIDDK Diabetes Branch, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. jyang@usouthal.edu

Abstract

Early studies reported that the size of adipose cells correlates with insulin resistance. However, a recent study comparing moderately obese, sensitive and resistant subjects, with comparable BMI (~30), did not detect any significant difference in the size of the large cells, but rather a smaller proportion of large cells in the resistant subjects, suggesting impaired adipogenesis. We hypothesize that a decreased proportion, rather than the size, of large adipose cells is also associated with insulin resistance in first-degree relatives of type 2 diabetic patients. Thirty-five leaner (BMI 18-34) subjects who were relatively healthy were recruited. Insulin sensitivity was measured by the euglycemic, hyperinsulinemic clamp. Needle biopsies of abdominal subcutaneous fat were assayed for adipose cell size by fitting the cell size distribution with two exponentials and a Gaussian function. The fraction of large cells was defined as the area of the Gaussian peak and the size of the large cells was defined as its center (c(p)). Glucose infusion rate (GIR) and c(p) were negatively correlated, but insulin sensitivity and the proportion of large cells were not correlated. BMI and c(p) were also strongly correlated, but a relationship of modest correlation between the cell size and insulin resistance was still significant after correcting for BMI. In contrast to moderately obese subjects, in the first-degree relatives of type 2 diabetic patients both BMI and the size of the large adipose cells predict the degree of insulin resistance; no correlation is found between the proportion of large adipose cells and insulin resistance.

PMID:
22240722
PMCID:
PMC3457700
DOI:
10.1038/oby.2011.371
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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