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Patient Educ Couns. 2013 Mar;90(3):378-85. doi: 10.1016/j.pec.2011.12.007. Epub 2012 Jan 11.

Factors that influence parents' experiences with results disclosure after newborn screening identifies genetic carrier status for cystic fibrosis or sickle cell hemoglobinopathy.

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1
Center for Patient Care and Outcomes Research, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Newborn screening (NBS) identifies genetic carriers for sickle cell hemoglobinopathy and cystic fibrosis. We aimed to identify factors during initial NBS carrier results disclosure by primary care providers (PCPs) that influenced parents' experiences and reactions.

METHODS:

Open-ended responses from telephone interviews with 270 parents of carriers were analyzed using mixed-methods. Conventional content analysis identified influential factors; chi-square tests analyzed relationships between factors and parent-reported reactions.

RESULTS:

Parents reported positive (35%) or negative (31%) reactions to results disclosure. Parents' experiences were influenced by specific factors: content messages (72%), PCP traits (47%), and aspects of the setting (30%). Including at least one of five specific content messages was associated (p<0.05) with positive parental reactions; omitting at least one of four specific content messages was associated (p<0.05) with negative parental reactions. Parents reported positive reactions when PCPs avoided jargon or were perceived as calm. Parents reported negative reactions to jargon usage and results disclosure by voicemail.

CONCLUSION:

Parents identified aspects of PCP communication which influenced their reactions and results disclosure experiences.

PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS:

Our findings suggest ways PCPs may improve communication of carrier results. PCPs should provide specific content messages and consider how their actions, characteristics, and setting can influence parental reactions.

PMID:
22240007
PMCID:
PMC3328613
DOI:
10.1016/j.pec.2011.12.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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