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J Nutr Health Aging. 2012 Jan;16(1):62-6.

Physical function predicts improvement in quality of life in elderly Icelanders after 12 weeks of resistance exercise.

Author information

1
Unit for Nutrition Research, National University Hospital of Iceland, Reykjavik, Iceland. olofgg@landspitali.is

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Little is known about the effects of resistance training on health related quality of life (HRQL) in the elderly.

AIM:

The main purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of resistance training on strength, body composition, functional capacity and HRQL in independent living elderly people. We hypothesised that resistance training would improve lean mass, muscle strength, physical function and HRQL.

METHODS:

Subjects (N = 237, 73.7±5.7 yrs, 58.2% female) participated in a 12-week resistance exercise program (3 times/week; 3 sets, 6-8 repetitions at 75-80% of the 1-repetition maximum) designed to increase strength and muscle mass of major muscle groups. Body composition, quadriceps- and grip strength, timed up and go test (TUG), six minute walk for distance (6MW) and HRQL were measured at baseline and endpoint.

RESULTS:

Two hundred-and-four participants completed the study. Although the increase in lean mass was small (+0.8 kg, P<0.01), quadriceps strength (+53.5 N), grip strength (+3.0 lb), TUG (-0.6 sec), 6MW (+33.6 m) and HRQL (+1.2 t-score) improved significantly (all P<0.01). Changes in 6MW predicted improvement in HRQL after 12 weeks.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our study shows that a 12-week resistance exercise program significantly improves lean mass, muscle strength, physical function and HRQL in elderly individuals, and that improvements in physical function predict improvements in HRQL. Our study indicates that resistance training should be promoted for the elderly as it has the potential to improve physical performance, thereby prolonging healthy, independent aging.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01074879.

PMID:
22238003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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