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Phys Ther. 2012 Apr;92(4):483-92. doi: 10.2522/ptj.20110213. Epub 2012 Jan 6.

Constraint-induced therapy with trunk restraint for improving functional outcomes and trunk-arm control after stroke: a randomized controlled trial.

Author information

1
Department of Occupational Therapy and Graduate Institute of Behavioral Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Studies have suggested that constraint-induced therapy combined with trunk restraint (CIT-TR) improves arm movement and reduces trunk compensation. Whether participants who receive CIT-TR can translate the benefits to real-life circumstances awaits further investigation.

OBJECTIVE:

The effects of distributed CIT-TR (dCIT-TR) on motor function, daily function, quality of life (QOL), and arm-trunk control were investigated.

DESIGN:

The study was a single-blind, randomized controlled trial.

SETTING:

The study took place at 4 hospitals.

PARTICIPANTS:

Participants were 57 people who had had a stroke 6 to 55 months earlier.

INTERVENTION:

Participants received a dose-matched intervention (2 hours per day, 5 days per week, for 3 weeks) of dCIT-TR, distributed constraint-induced therapy (dCIT), or control therapy.

MEASUREMENTS:

The Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), Motor Activity Log, Frenchay Activities Index (FAI), and Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) were used to evaluate motor function, daily function, and QOL. Data for reaching kinematics were recorded.

RESULTS:

Participants receiving dCIT-TR and dCIT exhibited higher overall scores on the ARAT, FAI, and hand function domain of the SIS and better quality of movement and larger amount of use (of the affected arm) on the Motor Activity Log than participants in the control group. Participants receiving dCIT-TR further demonstrated greater improvements on the ARAT grip subscale and FAI outdoor activities scale than participants receiving dCIT or participants in the control group. However, participants receiving dCIT showed greater improvements on the strength domain of the SIS after training than participants receiving dCIT-TR or participants in the control group. Limitations Research with a larger sample size is needed.

CONCLUSIONS:

Participants who received dCIT-TR were able to translate gains in arm-trunk control into functional performance and QOL, specifically in grip function and outdoor activities. A long-term study to examine the recovery course for force output may be needed to evaluate people's perception of less improvement in strength after dCIT-TR.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00564005.

PMID:
22228607
DOI:
10.2522/ptj.20110213
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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