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J Autoimmun. 2012 May;38(2-3):J282-91. doi: 10.1016/j.jaut.2011.11.013. Epub 2012 Jan 4.

Sex affects immunity.

Author information

1
Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

Sex based differences in immune responses, affecting both the innate and adaptive immune responses, contribute to differences in the pathogenesis of infectious diseases in males and females, the response to viral vaccines and the prevalence of autoimmune diseases. Indeed, females have a lower burden of bacterial, viral and parasitic infections, most evident during their reproductive years. Conversely, females have a higher prevalence of a number of autoimmune diseases, including Sjogren's syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and multiple sclerosis (MS). These observations suggest that gonadal hormones may have a role in this sex differential. The fundamental differences in the immune systems of males and females are attributed not only to differences in sex hormones, but are related to X chromosome gene contributions and the effects of environmental factors. A comprehensive understanding of the role that sex plays in the immune response is required for therapeutic intervention strategies against infections and the development of appropriate and effective therapies for autoimmune diseases for both males and females. This review will focus on the differences between male and female immune responses in terms of innate and adaptive immunity, and the effects of sex hormones in SLE, MS and RA.

PMID:
22225601
DOI:
10.1016/j.jaut.2011.11.013
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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