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Mol Cell Proteomics. 2012 Jun;11(6):M111.015131. doi: 10.1074/mcp.M111.015131. Epub 2012 Jan 5.

Comparative large scale characterization of plant versus mammal proteins reveals similar and idiosyncratic N-α-acetylation features.

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1
CNRS, Centre de Recherche de Gif, Institut des Sciences du Végétal, F-91198 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex, France.

Abstract

N-terminal modifications play a major role in the fate of proteins in terms of activity, stability, or subcellular compartmentalization. Such modifications remain poorly described and badly characterized in proteomic studies, and only a few comparison studies among organisms have been made available so far. Recent advances in the field now allow the enrichment and selection of N-terminal peptides in the course of proteome-wide mass spectrometry analyses. These targeted approaches unravel as a result the extent and nature of the protein N-terminal modifications. Here, we aimed at studying such modifications in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana to compare these results with those obtained from a human sample analyzed in parallel. We applied large scale analysis to compile robust conclusions on both data sets. Our data show strong convergence of the characterized modifications especially for protein N-terminal methionine excision, co-translational N-α-acetylation, or N-myristoylation between animal and plant kingdoms. Because of the convergence of both the substrates and the N-α-acetylation machinery, it was possible to identify the N-acetyltransferases involved in such modifications for a small number of model plants. Finally, a high proportion of nuclear-encoded chloroplast proteins feature post-translational N-α-acetylation of the mature protein after removal of the transit peptide. Unlike animals, plants feature in a dedicated pathway for post-translational acetylation of organelle-targeted proteins. The corresponding machinery is yet to be discovered.

PMID:
22223895
PMCID:
PMC3433923
DOI:
10.1074/mcp.M111.015131
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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