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Dysphagia. 2012 Sep;27(3):418-26. doi: 10.1007/s00455-011-9385-6. Epub 2012 Jan 4.

High-resolution manometry of pharyngeal swallow pressure events associated with effortful swallow and the Mendelsohn maneuver.

Author information

1
Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Surgery, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Clinical Science Center-H4, 600 Highland Ave., Madison, WI 53792, USA.

Abstract

Effortful swallow and the Mendelsohn maneuver are two common strategies to improve disordered swallowing. We used high-resolution manometry (HRM) to quantify the effects of these maneuvers on pressure and timing characteristics. Fourteen normal subjects swallowed multiple, 5-ml water boluses using three techniques: normal swallow, effortful swallow, and the Mendelsohn maneuver. Maximum pressure, rate, duration, area integral, and line integral were determined for the velopharynx and tongue base. Minimum pressure, duration of pressure-related change, duration of nadir pressure, maximum preopening and postclosure pressure, area integral, and line integral were recorded for the upper esophageal sphincter (UES). Area and line integrals of the velopharyngeal pressure curve significantly increased with the Mendelsohn maneuver; the line integral increased with the effortful swallow. Preopening UES pressure decreased significantly for the Mendelsohn, while postclosure pressure tended to increase insignificantly for both maneuvers. UES area and line integrals as well as nadir UES pressure duration increased with both maneuvers. Maneuver-dependent changes were observed primarily at the velopharynx and UES. These regions are critical to safe swallowing, as the velopharynx provides positive pressure at the bolus tail while the UES allows a bolus to enter the esophagus without risk of regurgitation. Integrals were more responsive than maximum pressure or duration and should be investigated further.

PMID:
22215280
PMCID:
PMC3717357
DOI:
10.1007/s00455-011-9385-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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