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Diabetes Care. 2012 Feb;35(2):313-8. doi: 10.2337/dc11-1455. Epub 2011 Dec 30.

Short sleep duration and poor sleep quality increase the risk of diabetes in Japanese workers with no family history of diabetes.

Author information

1
Department of Public Health Sciences, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan. toshikok@med.hokudai.ac.jp

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate whether a difference in the risk for diabetes exists in Japanese workers with regard to sleep duration/quality and the presence or absence of a family history of diabetes (FHD).

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

The researchers conducted a prospective, occupational-based study of local government employees in Sapporo, Japan. Between April 2003 and March 2004, 3,570 nondiabetic participants, aged 35-55 years, underwent annual health checkups and completed a self-administered questionnaire that included information on sleep duration/quality and FHD at baseline. Having diabetes was defined as taking medication for diabetes or a fasting plasma glucose level of ≥126 mg/dL at follow-up (2007-2008).

RESULTS:

A total of 121 (3.4%) new cases of diabetes were reported. In multivariate logistic regression models of workers without an FHD, and after adjustment for potential confounding factors, the odds ratio (95% CI) for developing diabetes was 5.37 (1.38-20.91) in those with a sleep duration of ≤5 h compared with those with a sleep duration of >7 h. Other risk factors were awakening during the night (5.03 [1.43-17.64]), self-perceived insufficient sleep duration (6.76 [2.09-21.87]), and unsatisfactory overall quality of sleep (3.71 [1.37-10.07]). In subjects with an FHD, these associations were either absent or weaker.

CONCLUSIONS:

The current study shows that poor sleep is associated with a higher risk of developing diabetes in workers without an FHD. Promoting healthy sleeping habits may be effective for preventing the development of diabetes in people without an FHD.

PMID:
22210572
PMCID:
PMC3263910
DOI:
10.2337/dc11-1455
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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