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J Burn Care Res. 2012 May-Jun;33(3):e120-6. doi: 10.1097/BCR.0b013e3182335a00.

Experience with corrective surgery for postburn contractures in Mumbai, India.

Author information

1
Division of Burn, Trauma and Critical Care, Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

Abstract

Postburn contracture is a source of significant morbidity in India, even though its occurrence can be reduced significantly by comprehensive postburn injury care, including surgical intervention. This study investigates whether limited access to initial medical care after burn injury has been associated with increased contracture formation among lower socioeconomic class patients in Mumbai, India. During a surgical mission in Mumbai, India, patients presenting with functionally debilitating burn contractures and minimal income were surveyed for initial care received immediately after burn injury. The survey consisted of questions regarding the history of burn injury and details of any initial treatment. Demographic data were collected by chart review. Thirty-eight patients from the state of Maharashtra participated in the study (mean age 28.1 years). The most common etiology of burn injury was from kerosene stove blasts (74%), and the most common morbidities were contractures of the neck and upper extremity. On average, time elapsed since the original injury was 2.8 years. Nearly all patients sought initial medical care at hospitals (97%) with the majority receiving only dressing changes for their full-thickness or deep-dermal burns (61%). The most common reason for not seeking out delayed burn reconstruction was perceived cost (65%). Ultimately, 60 operations were performed, of which 9 (15%) developed postsurgical complications. These data suggest that a subset of lower socioeconomic class burn patients in Maharashtra received suboptimal initial intervention. Comprehensive initial therapy after burn injury may provide better outcomes and limit the number of patients requiring delayed reconstruction.

PMID:
22210060
DOI:
10.1097/BCR.0b013e3182335a00
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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