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Exp Diabetes Res. 2012;2012:103063. doi: 10.1155/2012/103063. Epub 2011 Dec 8.

The pathophysiology of HIV-/HAART-related metabolic syndrome leading to cardiovascular disorders: the emerging role of adipokines.

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1
2nd Department of Cardiology, Attikon University Hospital of Athens, Haidari 12462, Greece.

Abstract

Individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) frequently demonstrate metabolic syndrome (MS) associated with increased incidence of cardiovascular disorders. Characteristics of HIV infection, such as immunodeficiency, viral load, and duration of the disease, in addition to the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have been suggested to induce MS in these patients. It is well documented that MS involves a number of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, like glucose, lipids, and arterial blood pressure abnormalities, leading to extensive atherogenic arterial wall changes. Nevertheless, the above traditional cardiovascular risk factors merely explain the exacerbated cardiovascular risk in MS. Nowadays, the adipose-tissue derivatives, known as adipokines, have been suggested to contribute to chronic inflammation and the MS-related cardiovascular disease. In view of a novel understanding on how adipokines affect the pathogenesis of HIV/HAART-related MS and cardiovascular complications, this paper focuses on the interaction of the metabolic pathways and the potential cardiovascular consequences. Based on the current literature, we suggest adipokines to have a role in the pathogenesis of the HIV/HAART-related MS. It is crucial to understand the pathophysiology of the HIV/HAART-related MS and apply therapeutic strategies in order to reduce cardiovascular risk in HIV patients.

PMID:
22203832
PMCID:
PMC3235775
DOI:
10.1155/2012/103063
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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