Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
J Korean Surg Soc. 2011 Dec;81(6):387-93. doi: 10.4174/jkss.2011.81.6.387. Epub 2011 Nov 25.

Carcinoembryonic antigen level of draining venous blood as a predictor of recurrence in colorectal cancer patient.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

We designed this study to evaluate the efficacy of carcinoembryonic antigen in draining venous blood (vCEA) as a predictor of recurrence.

METHODS:

Draining venous and supplying arterial bloods were collected separately during the operation of 82 colorectal cancer patients without distant metastasis from September 2004 to December 2006. Carcinoembryonic antigen was measured and assessed for the efficacy as a prognostic factor of recurrence using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and Kaplan-Meier curves.

RESULTS:

vCEA is a statistically significant factor that predicts recurrence (P = 0.032) and the optimal cut-off value for vCEA from ROC curve is 8.0 ng/mL. The recurrence-free survival between patients with vCEA levels >8 ng/mL and ≤8 ng/mL significantly differed (P < 0.001). The significance of vCEA as a predictor of recurrence gets higher when limited to patients without lymph node metastasis. The proper cut-off value for vCEA is 4.0 ng/mL if confined to patients without lymph node metastasis. The recurrence-free survival between the patients of vCEA levels >4 ng/mL and ≤4 ng/mL significantly differed (P < 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed vCEA is an independent prognostic factor in patients without lymph node metastasis.

CONCLUSION:

vCEA is an independent prognostic factor of recurrence in colorectal cancer patients especially in patients without lymph node metastases.

KEYWORDS:

Carcinoembryonic antigen; Colorectal neoplasms; Prognosis; Recurrence

PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for The Korean Surgical Society Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center