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Exp Hematol. 2012 Apr;40(4):342-55.e1. doi: 10.1016/j.exphem.2011.12.005. Epub 2011 Dec 20.

Nicotinamide, a SIRT1 inhibitor, inhibits differentiation and facilitates expansion of hematopoietic progenitor cells with enhanced bone marrow homing and engraftment.

Author information

1
Gamida Cell Ltd., Jerusalem, Israel. Tony@gamida-cell.com

Abstract

Strategies that increase homing to the bone marrow and engraftment efficacy of ex vivo expended CD34(+) cells are expected to enhance their clinical utility. Here we report that nicotinamide (NAM), a form of vitamin B-3, delayed differentiation and increased engraftment efficacy of cord blood-derived human CD34(+) cells cultured with cytokines. In the presence of NAM, the fraction of CD34(+)CD38(-) cells increased and the fraction of differentiated cells (CD14(+), CD11b(+), and CD11c(+)) decreased. CD34(+) cells cultured with NAM displayed increased migration toward stromal cell derived factor-1 and homed to the bone marrow with higher efficacy, thus contributing to their increased engraftment efficacy, which was maintained in competitive transplants with noncultured competitor cells. NAM is a known potent inhibitor of several classes of ribosylase enzymes that require NAD for their activity, as well as sirtuin (SIRT1), class III NAD(+)-dependent-histone-deacetylase. We demonstrated that EX-527, a specific inhibitor of SIRT1 catalytic activity, inhibited differentiation of CD34(+) cells similar to NAM, while specific inhibitors of NAD-ribosylase enzymes did not inhibit differentiation, suggesting that the NAM effect is SIRT1-specific. Our findings suggest a critical function of SIRT1 in the regulation of hematopoietic stem cell activity and imply the clinical utility of NAM for ex vivo expansion of functional CD34(+) cells.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01221857.

PMID:
22198152
DOI:
10.1016/j.exphem.2011.12.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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