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Curr Opin Pediatr. 2012 Feb;24(1):76-84. doi: 10.1097/MOP.0b013e32834ee594.

Effects of vaccine on rotavirus disease in the pediatric population.

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1
Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Department of Pediatrics, Hasbro Children's Hospital, The Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, USA. pdennehy@lifespan.org

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

Rotavirus infection is the most common cause of severe diarrhea disease in infants and young children worldwide and continues to have a major global impact on childhood morbidity and mortality. Two effective rotavirus vaccines are available and recommended for routine immunization of all infants. These vaccines have been introduced in both developed and developing countries. As rotavirus vaccines are implemented, studies have been undertaken that assess the effects of vaccination on rotavirus disease in children. This review summarizes the results of these studies.

RECENT FINDINGS:

Studies that assess health impact, indirect benefits, and strain changes after the introduction of rotavirus vaccine have been reported. In industrialized countries, rotavirus vaccination has led to dramatic drops in severe rotavirus-related hospitalizations and has reduced emergency room visits. Data from clinical trials in developing counties in Asia and Africa have demonstrated that rotavirus vaccines significantly reduce severe diarrhea episodes due to rotavirus. Herd (community) immunity has also been noted after routine rotavirus immunization in several countries. There have been no significant strain shifts or escape mutants noted since the introduction of rotavirus vaccines.

SUMMARY:

Two well tolerated and effective rotavirus vaccines have reduced the health burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis in both developed and developing countries.

PMID:
22189398
DOI:
10.1097/MOP.0b013e32834ee594
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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