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Can Respir J. 2011 Nov-Dec;18(6):e89-94.

The association between endotoxin and lung function among children and adolescents living in a rural area.

Author information

1
Canadian Centre for Health and Safety in Agriculture, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. josh.lawson@usask.ca

Abstract

BACKGROUND‚ĀĄ

OBJECTIVES:

Knowledge of the effects of domestic endotoxin on children's lung function is limited. The association between domestic endotoxin and asthma or wheeze and lung function among school-age children (six to 18 years of age) was examined. The interaction between endotoxin and other personal and environmental characteristics and lung function was also assessed.

METHODS:

A case-control study was conducted in and around the rural community of Humboldt, Saskatchewan, between 2005 and 2007. Parents of cases reported either doctor-diagnosed asthma or wheeze in the previous year. Controls were randomly selected from those not reporting these conditions. Data were collected by questionnaire to ascertain symptoms and conditions, while spirometry was used to measure lung function including forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 s. Dust collected from the child's play area floor and the child's mattress was used to quantify endotoxin, and saliva was collected to quantify cotinine levels and assess tobacco smoke exposure.

RESULTS:

There were 102 cases and 207 controls included in the present study. Lower forced expiratory volume in 1 s was associated with higher mattress endotoxin load among female cases (beta=-0.25, SE=0.07 [P<0.01]). There was a trend toward lower forced vital capacity, which was associated with higher play area endotoxin load among cases with high tobacco smoke exposure (beta=-0.17, SE=0.09 [P<0.10]).

CONCLUSIONS:

Findings indicated that high endotoxin levels present in common household areas of rural children with asthma or wheeze may also affect their lung function. These associations may be potentiated by tobacco smoke exposure and female sex.

PMID:
22187693
PMCID:
PMC3267627
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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